Frontotemporal dementia syndromes
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Frontotemporal dementia syndromes

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Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Dementia.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by John R. Hodges.
ContributionsHodges, John R.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRC521 .F75 2007
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 334 p. :
Number of Pages334
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20000263M
ISBN 100521854776
ISBN 109780521854771
LC Control Number2008297262

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  Frontotemporal Dementia Syndromes provides a much needed review of the current status of our knowledge of these syndromes. The book starts with chapters reviewing the history of the condition and describes the presenting clinical, neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological features, before reviewing, in detail, the areas of greatest recent.   The book concludes with a chapter proposing a multidisciplinary approach to patient management. Frontotemporal Dementia Syndromes will be essential reading for neurologists, psychologists, psychiatrists and other clinicians interested in cognitive and behavioural disorders, as well as to basic scientists working in the area of : Edited by John R. Hodges. Get this from a library! Frontotemporal dementia syndromes. [John R Hodges;] -- In the past decade there have been enormous advances in our understanding of frontotemporal dementia and related syndromes. The impetus for these advances has come from a number of directions. Frontotemporal Dementia provides an in-depth look at the history, various types, genetics, neuropathology and psychosocial aspects of one of the most common but least understood causes of dementia, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, from one of the world's leading centers for the study of dementia. Aided by the latest research in diagnosis, mechanism and treatment, this book 5/5(2).

  Frontotemporal Dementia Syndromes provides a much needed review of the current status of our knowledge of these syndromes. The book starts with chapters reviewing the history of the condition and describes the presenting clinical, neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological features, before reviewing, in detail, the areas of greatest recent Price: $ Buy Frontotemporal Dementia Syndromes by Hodges, John R. (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Originally published in , this book reflects the enormous advances in our understanding of frontotemporal dementia and related syndromes. The impetus for these advances has come from a number of directions including genetic discoveries, fresh approaches to neuroimaging and improved neuropsychological understanding of the cognitive aspects.   Originally published in , this book reflects the enormous advances in our understanding of frontotemporal dementia and related syndromes. The impetus for these advances has come from a number of directions including genetic discoveries, fresh approaches to neuroimaging and improved neuropsychological understanding of the cognitive aspects of /5(3).

Although no book can completely capture the rapid revolutions in the field of frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Frontotemporal Dementia Syndromes certainly does a great job in summarising some of these advances, and serves as an excellent treatise on these disorders for all professionals with an interest in neurodegenerative disorders. Frontotemporal dementia Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in BMJ (online) (aug12 3):ff August with Reads How we measure 'reads'. Chapter 17 discusses the three main frontotemporal dementia (FTD) syndromes—the behavioral variant (bvFTD), which comprises over half of patients, and the language-predominant syndromes of progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) and semantic dementia (SD), with a focus on the pathology and pathophysiology, genetic contribution, clinical presentations, diagnosis, . Progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) is a disorder of language characterized by nonfluent spontaneous speech, with hesitancy, agrammatism, and phonemic errors, requiring significant effort in speech production. It fits within the spectrum of frontotemporal dementia syndromes and may be seen with a corticobasal syndrome.